Project Consortium

     INTEGRAL Partners,  Cross-Project Meeting in Dublin 2014  INTEGRAL Consortium   The INTEGRAL consortium consists of 21 partners from 13 countries. Due to the inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary nature of the project, the team involves experts with different disciplinary backgrounds and research interests inter alia...

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INTEGRAL landscape case study areas

 

    Bulgaria ___

(1) Teteven 

(2) Yundola

  INTEGRAL case-study-areas maps

Source: google Inc./ Imagery©2013 NASATerra Metrics

___  
France
(3) Pontenx  
     Italy

(4) Asiago 

(5) Etna 

(6) Molise

 
     Portugal

(7) Chamusca

(8) Leiria 

(9) Vale de Souza 

     Sweden

(10) Helge å 

(11) Vilhelmina 

 
     Slowakia

(12) Kysuce 

(13) Podpolanie 

_______
       
     Germany

(14) Munich South

(15) Upper Palatinate

 
     Netherlands

(16) South-East Veluwe

 
     Ireland

(17) Newmarket 

(18) Western peatland 

 
     Lithuania (19) Suvalkija 

(20) Zemaitija

    ______________

 


 (1) Teteven, Bulgaria

 

Teteven Municipality is placed in a mountainous area in Lovech Province in the North Central region of Bulgaria. It is located on the northern slopes of the Stara planina mountain and is named after its administrative centre - the town of Teteven (10000 people), crossed by the River Vit. The distance from the town of Teteven to Sofia is 120 km. The municipality borders on 10 other municipalities of Lovech, Sofia and Plovdiv regions. These are the municipalities of Jablanica, Lukovit, Ugarchin, Lovech, Troyan, Karlovo, Anton, Pirdop, Zlatitsa, Etropole and Pravetz.Teteven Municipality covers an area of approximately 697 km2. There are 13 settlements in the municipality, inhabited by 22,016 people (December 2009).

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(2) Yundola, Bulgaria

 

The area is placed in the southwestern part of Bulgaria. This region of dramatic physiographic and biologic diversity includes a broad spectrum of vegetation and natural sightseeing and phenomena. It is mainly woodland landscape with forests in all parts of area (about 90%). There are very productive coniferous forests. Agricultural landscapes are presented by meadows located near the village of Yundola and the other surrounding villages. The whole wooded area belongs to the Experimental Forest Department "Youndola" and is managed by the University of Forestry in Sofia as an outdoor classroom and research facility. The Experimental Forest Department Yundola is located on the boundary between two Bulgarian mountains (Rila and Rodopi) and occupies an area of 5211 hectares. 91% (4750 ha) of that area is covered by forests.

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ] 

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(3) Pontenx, France

 

The Pontenx pilot site is situated in the Aquitaine region (NUTS 2) at the Landes department (NUTS 3) and includes the following municipalities: Escource, Ste Eulalie-en-Born, Pontenx-les-forges, Aureilhan, Solférino, Gastes, Lue, Sabres, Mimizan, Commensacq, Trensacq, St Paul-en-Born, Labouheyre . Its surface represents 10.7% of the department, 55 km long and 34 km wide, with a coast of approximately 23 km. It is extremely representative of the Maritime Pine system of south west of France called "Massif landais" as it includes littoral sand dunes owned by state, municipal forest and private forest. 

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(4) Asiago, Italy

 

Veneto Region covers an area of approximately 1,839,122 hectares and, according to the National Forest Inventory, 446,856 ha (24.3%) are forested. It is located in the north-eastern part of Italy (Figure 1) and is bordered to the east by Friuli Venezia Giulia, to the south by Emilia-Romagna, to the west by Lombardy and to the north by Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. At its northern most corner it borders also on Austria. Veneto can be divided into four areas: the northern Alpine zone, the hill zone, the lower plain and the coastal territory. 

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(5) Etna, Italy

 

Sicily (‘Sicilian region’) is located in the central Mediterranean. It extends from the tip of the Apennine peninsula from which it is separated only by the narrow Strait of Messina, towards the North African coast (Figure 1). Its most prominent landmark is Etna mountain, which is at 3,320 m the highest active volcano in Europe and one of the most active in the world. The island has a typical Mediterranean climate, with mild and wet winters and hot, dry summers. Sicilian region covers an area of about 2.5 millions of hectares, of which 520,000 (21%) are forested. The terrain of inland Sicily is mostly hilly, and intensively cultivated wherever it was possible. Along the northern coast, mountain ranges of Madonie, 2,000 m, Nebrodi 1,800 m, and Peloritani, 1,300 m, represent an extension of mainland Appennines chain. The cone of Etna mountain dominates over the eastern coast. In the south-east lie lower Hyblaean Mountains, 1,000 m. The mines of the Enna and Caltanissetta districts were a leading sulfur-producing area throughout the 19th century, but have declined since the 1950s. The autonomous region also includes several neighboring islands: the Aegadian Islands, the Aeolian Islands, Pantelleria and Lampedusa. The island is drained by several rivers, most of which flow through the central area and enter the sea at the south of the island. Sicily is an often-quoted example of man-made deforestation, which was practiced since Roman times, when the island was made an agricultural region. This gradually dampened the climate, leading to decline of rainfall and drying of rivers. Today, entire central and southwest provinces are practically without any forests. That also affected the island's wild fauna, of which is little left in the pastures and crop fields of the inland. The natural flora and fauna of the coastal region too has all but disappeared. The last section of pristine coastal wilderness is the RiservadelloZingaro (The Gypsy) near San Vito lo Capo. In Sicily there are only two metropolitan areas, Palermo that has a larger urban zone of about 900,000 people and Catania whose larger urban zone is of 650,000 people. Administratively Sicily is divided into nine provinces, each with a capital city of the same name as the province.

 

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(6) Molise, Italy

 

Molise region, located in Central Italy, was formed in 1963. It covers an area of 443,800 hectares, of which 157,609 are forested (35.5%) (Figure 1). The regional landscape is mainly mountainous (55%) and hilly (45%). The average altitude is 631 m a.s.l. and the highest mountain is ‘Monte Miletto’ (2050 m a.s.l.), belonging to the Apennine Chain. In the North-Eastern part, the Molise region has a short coastline of about 35 Km on the Adriatic sea. By an administrative point of view, the Molise region is structured into 2 provinces, Campobasso and Isernia, and 136 Municipalities, with a total population of approximately 320,000 inhabitants. The ‘Alto Molise’ Mountain Community is located in the Northern part of Molise region and it covers an area of 42,032 hectares (9.5% of the total regional area), of which 24,544 are forested. It is constituted by 12 Municipalities, altogether belonging to the Isernia province. The altitude range shifts from 350 m a.s.l. to 1,746 m a.s.l. The case study refers to the Collemeluccio-Montedimezzo Biosphere Reserve area.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(7) Chamusca, Portugal

 

The Chamusca region, which covers an area of 74600 ha (IGP, 2009), is a rural county with 7 administrative subdivisions (parish): Vale Cavalos, Chouto, Parreira, Ulme, Pinheiro Grande and Chamusca. It is located in central Portugal, 120 km away from Lisbon. Forestland and Shrubland represent 69% and 11% of the Chamusca area, respectively, according to 2007 land use data. The main species are cork oak, eucalyptus, maritime pine and stone pine. In terms of area covered, cork oak is the most important species in terms of area followed by Eucalypt. These species appear mainly in pure stands, but some mixed stands can also be found. The large number of fires experienced in Portugal in 2003 consumed a large area of the county, affecting the majority of the landowners, in some cases with heavy fire-related losses. This event affected regional forest products availability, and this was observed in the results provided by the simulations accomplished for this case study along the INTEGRAL project.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(8) Leiria, Portugal

 

Leiria National Forest (LNF) is a public forest located approximately at 150 Km north of Lisbon in central-west Portugal.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(9) Vale de Souza, Portugal

 

The study area is included in the regional land use planning of Tamega with an extension of 261.963 ha. The Sousa Valley ZIFs extend over an area of approximately 14800 ha and are located approximately at 50 Km east of Oporto city.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(10) Helge å, Sweden

The case study area is the intersection between the catchment area of the Helgeån river and Kronoberg county. Our strategy was to select a case area that sufficiently well represents forest conditions and socio-economic settings in Southern Sweden, rather than selecting a “hot spot” with a specific land-use conflict or other salient issue atypical for the region. The case area of 152,000 ha is heavily forested (ca. 80% forest cover), the forest area being dominated by non-industrial private forest owners (80% of the forest area). Falling within level 3 in the NUTS classification, Kronoberg county (län) occupies 846,000 ha, thus the selected case area takes c. 20% of the county’s territory. The county includes 8 municipalities that, however, have little impact on forest management.

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(11) Vilhelmina, Sweden

 

The Vilhelmina case study area consists of the Vilhelmina municipality. It is a typical rural area in northern Sweden with a low and decreasing population density; there are currently about 7,000 inhabitants on an area of 8 100 km2 giving 0.9 person per km2 and the number of inhabitants is decreasing with approximately 1 % per year. Half of the population lives in the Vilhelmina city. There are nine other small village, and a number of other places where people live. 

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(12) Kysuce, Slovakia

 

The area occupied north-western Slovakia, situated around the Kysuca river and bordering the Czech Republic in the west and Poland in the North. It is agricultural – woodland landscape with forests in upper part of area, in the higher altitude (about 56%) and agricultural mostly in lower hollow basin and furrows separated by hills. There are productive and very productive deciduous - coniferous forests. Agricultural is from low productive (upper parts of agricultural landscape) to middle productive on lowest part of area and floodplains. Almost half of area is part of Kysuce Protected Landscape Area, which takes north – west and north – east part of territory.

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(13) Podpolanie, Slovakia

 

The area is agricultural – forest land with forest in the north part area (about 51 % of area) and agricultural in the south. An upper part of forest area takes beech and fir-beech forests, lower parts takes Carpathian oak-hornbeam forests. Agricultural ̀s parts of area are from middle to low productive, but it is a region with a specific cultural landscape development. Especially in surround of Hriňová town, where the cultural is characterized by dispersed rural settlements and a traditional land use – small private owners. The region has never undergone collectivization in the 20th century therefore it represents a unique opportunity to study relations between man and landscape. North part of area (almost forest) is part of Protected Landscape Area Poľana - the Poľana Biosphere Reserve.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(14) Munich South, Germany

 

The case study area "Munich South" represents a city-near forest landscape of about 60.000 ha of which 72% are forested. It is mainly defined by the southern part of the rural district of Munich (NUT 3) with about 494 inhabitants per square kilometer. The landscape in the case study area has been formed by glacial processes. The forests have indispensable protection functions, most important for the sustainable supply of the city with high quality drinking water, and outstanding recreation functions. The soils are productive and support good forest growth. Due to the proximity of the Alps precipitation is comparably high, also leading to good forest conditions on many sights. Norway spruce monocultures are the most productive ones in the region, though increasingly transformed into mixed forests since about three decades.

The largest forest owner of the case study are is the federal state of Bavaria (38% of the forest area). A smaller, but also important forest owner is the city of Munich (6%). However, most of the forests (55%) are privately owned and small forest owners dominate. The abandonment of smaller forest properties is one of the rising issues in the region. High ecosystem services density is one of the most important features of the area. Traditional forest use in this region meets a strong demand of recreational services as well as the need for drinking water protection and supply. Urban population is generally very critical when confronted with any kind of traditional forest utilization. Even "normal" sustainable felling measures can lead to public protests if not adequately communicated. Forests also face strong competition for land use, land prizes are high near the growing city of Munich.

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(15) Upper Palatinate, Germany

 

The case study area in the administrative district Upper Palatinate comprises the rural districts Schwandorf (NUT 3) and Cham (NUT 3) next to the border to the Czech Republic in the south-eastern part of Germany. The case study area covers an area round about 300.000 ha, 53% covered by forests. With about 90 inhabitants per square kilometre for Germany it is a good example of a large rural area.

In terms of forestry and agriculture, Upper Palatinate is an important region in Bavaria. There is a high degree of forest product utilisation by sawmills and energy suppliers. Due to human influence, the case study area is dominated by coniferous tree species – Norway Spruce (Picea abies) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris). The most important deciduous species is Common beech (Fagus sylvatica). Considerable forest areas are owned by many small forest owners (55%), a few large private forest enterprises (15%), and the federal state of Bavaria (30%). 

Here, the arising competition between the "new" biomass utilisation (mostly for energy production purposes) from forests and traditional forest products is even more challenging compared to other regions, because due to weaker growth conditions nutrient extraction by full-tree harvesting can be expected to become a problem for sustainable use earlier than in other regions. There are societal demands on the forests as resources for biodiversity and as space for recreation and wood utilization is better accepted in the region Upper Palatinate compared to the case study area Munich South. Addressing small-scale private forest owners and supporting them to achieve objectives by managing their forests is the goal of the well organised forest owner associations in Upper Palatinate. Still, some small forest properties are abandoned.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(16) South-East Veluwe, The Netherlands

 

The Netherlands is one of the most densely populated areas in Europe with an average population density of about 494 inhabitants per km2 (xxxxx).

 

The Dutch forests are relatively young. Due to overexploitation and conversion of forest to agricultural land, around 1900 only 3 to 4% of the Netherlands was forested. Thanks to major plantation efforts, the forested area has since increased (Eland and Wiersum, 2003; Hoogstra and Willems, 2005). At this moment, the forest area is about 360,000 ha, which is approximately 11% of the country. This means that per person 200m2 of forest area is available (CBS, 2012).

 

The distribution of forests over the country is rather unequal as in the more densely populated provinces in the Western part of the country and in the agricultural provinces in the North and Southwest forest cover is about 1 to 4 %, whereas in the other provinces forest cover ranges between 10 and 20 % (Mohren and Vodde, s.a.).

 

The Dutch case study area, the South-East Veluwe, is a forest area which is part of the Veluwe. The Veluwe is an extensive forest and nature area of about 110 000 ha in the center of the Netherlands, in the province of Gelderland. The case study area comprises 8000 ha and is located on the south-eastern border of the Veluwe.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

 

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(17) Newmarket, Ireland

The Newmarket case study area (CSA) is 187,820 ha, it takes in the north of county Cork. Although the overall area is essentially rural, with three towns situated at the periphery of the case study, the south-east border is no more than ten miles from Cork city. The central part of the case study, known as the Duhallow region, is designated as a disadvantaged area vis à vis the allocation of EU structural funds. The population density is quite low reflecting the rural character of the area. From 1946 through to 2002, the population declined by 8.6%. 

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(18) Western Peatland, Ireland

The western peatlands case study area (CSA) is 1,061,148 ha and is located in the northwest of Ireland (Figure 1), it is based on a Business Area Unit, a method of land division and management used by Coillte, Ireland’s state forestry board. There are 8 BAUs in the Republic of Ireland. Their boundaries follow townland boundaries as much as possible and they were designed to be independently profitable units. The CSA is approximately 1 million ha of which approximately 116,000 ha (11%) are forested.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(19) Suvalkija, Lithuania

 

Suvalkija [1] is the smallest of the five cultural regions of Lithuania. Its unofficial capital is Marijampolė. It is located south of the Nemunas River. Historically, it is the newest ethnographic region as it’s most distinct characteristics and separate identity formed during the 19th century when the territory was part of Congress Poland. It was never a separate political entity and even today it has no official status in the administrative division of Lithuania, though its area belongs to former Marijampolė County (region today). However, it continues to be the subject of studies focusing on Lithuanian folk culture of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

 

Suvalkija has long been known as an affluent agricultural region. An increased demand for wood prompted resettlement and deforestation of the region during the 16th and 17th centuries. The demand led to illegal tree-harvesting incursions from the Duchy of Prussia. To discourage this, the Grand Dukes of Lithuania even established several border villages which slowly spread further south and east by the mid of 17th century. The demand for wood experienced a sharp decrease and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania lost almost half of its population due to the Northern Wars (1655–1661), famine, and plague. Settlers were attracted by its fertile farmland, which had largely been cleared of forests, and by the relative ease of serfdom in the area. Serfdom in Suvalkija was abolished in 1807 by Napoleon Bonaparte: peasants acquired personal freedoms, although they could not own land. That changed only in 1861 when serfdom was abolished in the entire Russian Empire. By the 1820s, farmers in Suvalkija had begun to divide their villages into individual farmsteads. This development is a clear indicator of economic prosperity among the peasants. Early abolition of serfdom, fertile land, and close economic ties with East Prussia contributed to Suvalkija's relative wealth. Such situation led to the on-going perception that its inhabitants are very rational, clever, and extremely frugal, even greedy.

 

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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(20)  Zemaitija, Lithuania

Žemaitija (literally lowlands) or Samogitia is one of the five ethnographic regions of Lithuania. It is located in northwestern Lithuania. The region has a long and distinct cultural history, reflected in the existence of the Samogitian language, which is called by Lithuanians - Samogitian dialect. In 2010 the Samogitian language was assigned with an ISO 639-3 code: "sgs" and got the official status of a language. Žemaitija is one of the most ethnically homogenous regions of the country, with an ethnic Lithuanian population exceeding 99.5% in some districts.

[More about the Case Study Area in INTEGRAL WP2 Summary Report on the Biogeological Limitations of the Case-Study Landscapes ]

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